Government

Gov to remove European Vnuk law from UK legislation

The effects of the 2014 European Court of Justice’s ruling in the Vnuk case resulted in excessive liabilities on the insurance industry and potential increases in motorists’ insurance premiums

The UK government is preparing to remove the effects of the 2014 European Court of Justice’s ruling in the Vnuk case from the country’s law.

Peter Bone MP has now introduced a private member’s bill to remove Vnuk from UK legislation.

Vnuk is a 2014 European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling, which came to pass after a Slovenian farmer was knocked off his ladder by a reversing tractor-trailer on a private farm in 2007.

Since 2014, the government has never agreed with the initial ruling, which directed the “unnecessary extension of the provisions requiring motor insurance to private land”.

Furthermore, it extended provisions for a greater range of vehicles, including motorsports, agricultural machinery and light electric vehicles.

The legislation has reportedly resulted in “excessive liabilities” on the insurance industry and potential increases in motorists’ insurance premiums.

In February, when the government’s plan to scrap the EU law was announced, transport secretary Grant Schnapps said: “We have always disagreed with this over-the-top law that would only do one thing – hit the pockets of hard-working people up and down the country with an unnecessary hike in their car insurance.

“I am delighted to announce that we no longer need to implement it. Scrapping this rule would save the country billions of pounds and is part of a new and prosperous future for the UK outside the EU – a future in which we set our own rules and regulations.”

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